One Bite at a Time


I'm Kate. I used to not eat. I had Anorexia Nervosa and got very sick and hated my life. A few years ago I began a recovery process, which I believe is a lifelong deal. I'm still in the process of healing my mind, body, and spirit, and there are a lot of things that help me do this. Here is a short list!
-Buddhist Mindfulness practice, meditation, Radical Acceptance, praying, the Psalms
-Food. Lots of it. Mostly only the delicious kind.
-Exercise. Lots of it. Mostly only the fun kind. A jezziefriend called it Slayer Training, which I joyfully stole. If you don't know what this means, don't worry. If you do, I love you.
-Therapy (still. I think it might never end.)
-Having good friends and family, both IRL and on the wonderwebs (*trademark, my brother.)
-12 Step recovery principles (but I am not a Big Book Thumper, so please don't be afraid.)

This will be a place for me to dump copious amounts of recipes (the good and the bad), talk about spirituality and what I learn in my weekly sitting group, repost inspiring and awesome quotes and stories, and share ridiculous and/or obscene pictures, gifs, and assorted other whatnots. That's how I roll. I hope you will enjoy.

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He allowed himself to be swayed by his conviction that human beings are not born once and for all on the day their mothers give birth to them, but that life obliges them over and over again to give birth to themselves.
— Gabriel Garcí­a Márquez, Love in the Time of Cholera (via observando)

Tagged: RIP

Source: observando

[TW: rape] How We Teach Our Kids That Women Are Liars →

sorayachemaly:

Two weeks ago a man in France was arrested for raping his daughter. She’d gone to her school counselor and then the police, but they needed “hard evidence.” So, she videotaped her next assault. Her father was eventually arrested. His attorney explained, “There was a period when he was unemployed and in the middle of a divorce. He insists that these acts did not stretch back further than three or four months. His daughter says longer. But everyone should be very careful in what they say.” Because, really, even despite her seeking help, her testimony, her bravery in setting up a webcam to film her father raping her, you really can’t believe what the girl says, can you?

Everyone “knows” this. Even children.

Three years ago, in fly-on-the-wall fashion of parent drivers everywhere, I listened while a 14-year-old girl in the back seat of my car described how angry she was that her parents had stopped allowing her to walk home alone just because a girl in her neighborhood “claimed she was raped.” When I asked her if there was any reason to think the girl’s story was not true, she said, “Girls lie about rape all the time.”  

She didn’t know the person, she just assumed she was lying.

No one says, “You can’t trust women,” but distrust them we do. College students surveyed revealed that they think up to 50% of their female peers lie when they accuse someone of rape, despite wide-scale evidence and multi-country studies that show the incident of false rape reports to be in the 2%-8% range, pretty much the same as false claims for other crimes. As late as 2003, people jokingly (wink, wink) referred to Philadelphia’s sex crimes unit as “the lying bitch unit.” If an 11-year-old girl told an adult that her father took out a Craigslist ad to find someone to beat and rape her while he watched, as recently actually occurred, what do you think the response would be? Would she need to provide a videotape after the fact? 

It goes way beyond sexual assault as well. That’s just the most likely and obvious demonstration of “women are born to lie” myths. Women’s credibility is questioned in the workplace, in courts, by law enforcement, indoctors’ offices, and in our political system. People don’t trust women to be bosses, or pilots, or employees. Pakistan’s controversial Hudood Ordinance still requires a female rape victim to procure four male witnesses to her rape or risk prosecution for adultery. In August, a survey of managers in the United States revealed that they overwhelmingly distrust women who request flextime.  It’s notable, of course, that women are trusted to be mothers—the largest pool of undervalued, unpaid, economically crucial labor.

Pop culture and art are just the cherry on the top of the icing on a huge cake. The United States is among the most religious of all countries in the industrialized world. So, while some people wring their hands over hip hop, I’m more worried about how men like Rick Santorum and Ken Cuccinelli explain to their daughters why they can’t be priests. I know that there is hip hop that exceeds the bounds of taste and is sodden with misogyny. But, people seem to think that those manifestations of hatred are outside of the mainstream when, in reality, it’s just more of the same set to great beats.  Hip hop has nothing on religious misogyny and its political expression. 

An entire political party’s “social policy” agenda is being pursued under a rubric that insists women need “permission slips” and “waiting periods.” The recent shutdown? Conservatives holding the country hostage because they want to add anti-abortion “conscience clause” language to legislation. Whose consciences are we talking about? All the morally incompetent and untrustworthy men who need abortions?

It’s no exaggeration to say that distrust of women is the driving force of the “social issues” agenda of the Republican Party. From food stamps and “legitimate rape,” to violence against women and immigration policy. “We need to target the mother. Call it sexist, but that’s the way nature made it,” explained the man who penned Arizona’s immigration law. “Men don’t drop anchor babies, illegal alien mothers do.” I could do this ad infinitum.

See entire piece at Role/Reboot here. 

 

Source: sorayachemaly

Today I was reminded that “In Your Eyes” is one of the best love songs ever written.

Tagged: it's poetrydon't argue with me

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.
But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.
Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.
In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.
Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]


They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting. 
Those were the days.

wired:

theatlantic:

The Quiet Radicalism of All That

The ’90s were golden years for Nickelodeon. The children’s cable television network was home to now cult-classic shows like Are You Afraid of the Dark? (1991-2000), Clarissa Explains It All (1991-’94), The Secret Life of Alex Mack (1994-’98), and Salute Your Shorts (1991-’92)—arguably heretofore unmatched in their clever, un-condescending approach to entertaining young people. Nick News with Linda Ellerbee launched in 1992, and remains to this day one of the only shows on-air devoted to frank, engaging discussions of teen issues and opinions.

But perhaps the program that best embodied the values of Nick in those years was All That, a sketch-comedy show that premiered 20 years ago today. Created by Brian Robbins and Mike Tollin, All That ran for an impressive 10 seasons before it was canceled in 2005. The prolific franchise spawned a number of spin-offs (Good Burger, Kenan & Kel, The Amanda Show) and launched the careers of several comedy mainstays: Kenan Thompson, Amanda Bynes, Nick Cannon, and Taran Killam.

Like Saturday Night Live (which would later hire Thompson and Killam), All That was a communal pop-cultural touchstone. The parents of ’90s kids had the Church Lady, “more cowbell,” and Roseanne Roseannadanna; the kids themselves, though, had Pierre Escargot, “Vital Information,” and Repairman Man Man Man, and we recited their catch-phrases to one another in the cafeteria and on the playground. Although All That was clearly designed as a SNL, Jr., of sorts, it wasn’t merely starter sketch comedy—it was an admittedly daring venture for a children’s network to embark on.

In its own right, All That was a weirdly subversive little show. It never explicitly crossed the line into “mature” territory, but it constantly flirted with the limits of FCC-approved family-friendliness. Take, for instance, the “Ask Ashley” sketch. A barely tween-aged Amanda Bynes (Seasons Three to Six), played an adorably wide-eyed video advice-columnist. Ashley (“That’s me!”) would read painfully dimwitted letters from fans with clearly solvable problems. (Example: “Dear Ashley, I live in a two-story house and my room is upstairs. Every morning, when it’s time to go to school, I jump out the window. So far I’ve broken my leg 17 times. Do you have any helpful suggestions for me?”) She would wait a beat, smile sweetly into the camera, then fly into a manic rage; emitting a stream of G-rated curses, always tantalizingly on the verge of spitting a true obscenity into the mix.

Read more. [Image: Nickelodeon]

They don’t make kid’s shows like they used to — not only in regards to actual content, but also in reference to the diversity of the casting.

Those were the days.

Source: theatlantic

An association between eating disorder behaviors and dysautonomia. →

Extant research suggests autonomic dysfunction, and the concomitant neuropeptide and hypothalamic disturbances, are unique to clinical ED populations and are secondary to extreme eating pathology (Gendall, Kaye, Altemus, McConaha, & La Via, 1999). According to this conceptualization, autonomic dysfunction is the biological consequent of extreme restriction, binging, purging, and other maladaptive compensatory behaviors.

If autonomic dysfunction is predicted by the full continuum of ED symptoms, it may represent an important pathophysiological mechanism, present at subclinical levels of eating disturbance, which dynamically interacts with ED cognitive and behavioral factors to significantly alter hunger/satiety signals and contribute, at least in part, to subsequent full-blown EDs. If so, the severity of autonomic dysfunction early in disease progression may be predictive of long-term outcome.

Tagged: this is interesting to only me but here you goPOTSheart nonsensedysautonomiaeating disorder

The POTS tag on Tumblr is really interesting, because it’s half posts about chronic illness and half posts about ornamental pots. Like for flowers.

Tagged: pots

Dysautonomia International - Exercises for Dysautonomia Patients →

runningonspoons:

This is by far the best resources I’ve found so far about exercise and dysautonomia. The article details three levels:

  • level one is gentle reclined exercises. this is where you start if you are bedridden and includes things like squeezing a pillow between your arms or legs, or writing your name in the air with your toes
  • level two is reclined exercises, such as recumbent bikes, rowing, and swimming as well as mat based strengthening/toning exercises 
  • level three is normal exercises, with special focus on leg and core strength. if you can do level 3 exercises already, maintaining your ability to do them is key

This is my favorite kind of resource because it is good detailed information, not preachy or shaming people for not doing more, and has a starting point for patients at all different levels of conditioning 

Tagged: dysautonomiaPOTSheart nonsense

First attempt at homemade Pattaya, inspired by @superpickler and her awesome food pics from Malaysia! (It’s delicious by the way.)

First attempt at homemade Pattaya, inspired by @superpickler and her awesome food pics from Malaysia! (It’s delicious by the way.)

I promise I’m not going to become one of those people who documents her workouts, but this is the second day in a row I’ve been able to do this with no symptoms and I am laughing in the gym like a weirdo.

Tagged: heart nonsensePOTS

inothernews:

allisonunsupervised:

coolchicksfromhistory:

thelifeguardlibrarian:

mildhorror:

Here’s the link for more information about the PS244 fundraising campaign

Here’s the link to the GIVE IT ALL TO ME Library Collection at OutofPrintClothing.com.

Check it out! The good folks dropped me a line about this project last week, and I’m happy to boost for Library Week.

Signal boost

So hey, #education…

I love these.  Love them.  And for a great cause.

Tagged: I want

Source: mildhorror